Places to go

There are plently of places and routes close by to us. Below are some suggestions for routes and places to visit.

Visit the Lake District National Park for sights like no other. Take it all in on a traditional steamboat chugging through tranquil lakes, or scale the highest mountains England has to offer and enjoy a jaw-dropping view. From the top of Scafell Pike it’s easy to see how Cumbria’s lakes captivated William Wordsworth and Beatrix Potter. If tranquillity isn’t enough for you, then why not race through the Lake District on a mountain bike or enjoy the scenery from the middle of one of England’s fastest growing music festivals, Kendal Calling. You may as well sample some of the town’s famous Kendal Mint Cake while you’re there too, after all it got Edmund Hillary to the summit of Everest.
Northumberland is a magical place filled with ancient castles; hidden gardens; unspoilt beaches; rolling hills; rugged moorland; sweeping views; friendly little market towns and a cultural heritage all of its own.
Scotland, the U.K.’s northernmost country, is a land of mountain wildernesses such as the Cairngorms and Northwest Highlands, interspersed with glacial glens (valleys) and lochs (lakes). Its major cities are Edinburgh, the capital, with its iconic hilltop castle, and Glasgow, famed for its vibrant cultural scene. Scotland is also famous for golf, the game first played at the Old Course at St Andrews in the 1400s.
Yorkshire is a historic county in northern England. It’s known for its Roman and Viking heritage, as well as its Norman castles, medieval abbeys, Industrial Revolution-era cities and 2 national parks. The county town of York, founded by the Romans, is home to 13th-century cathedral York Minster, Tudor houses and medieval walls. The interactive Jorvik Viking Centre recalls the area’s 9th-century Norse occupation.
Scottish Highland Games are among the most popular events in the country, with our visitors and residents alike. If you visit us any time between May and September, you are bound to catch a gathering somewhere in the country, for a great family day out. These are must-see events, combining a cultural treat and a fun day for all the family. You’ll find them in most parts of Scotland, so wherever you are, you won’t be far away.Most events will have numerous stalls, piping and drumming competitions, highland dancing competitions, and many athletic events, including throwing the hammer and famous tossing the caber.
Grizedale Forest nestles in the heart of the Lake District between lakes Windermere and Coniston. Activities range from gentle walks to swinging through the trees on GoApe, enjoying a leisurely meal in the Grizedale Café to exhilarating mountain bike rides. There are eight waymarked walking trails ranging from the easy access Ridding Wood Trail to the strenuous Silurian Way, with forty sculptures across the forest to discover. Cyclists can try the North Face single track mountain bike trail as well as the many forest roads.
Every year thousands of performers take to hundreds of stages all over Edinburgh to present shows for every taste. From big names in the world of entertainment to unknown artists looking to build their careers, the festival caters for everyone and includes theatre, comedy, dance, physical theatre, circus, cabaret, children’s shows, musicals, opera, music, spoken word, exhibitions and events.
Enjoy a fantastic mix of outdoor sports, activities and live music with the Keswick Mountain Festival. Based in Crow Park on the banks of Derwentwater, each year the Festival inspires thousands of people to get outside and enjoy the outdoors. With a variety of activities to choose from, there’s plenty of choice no matter what your age or ability. Families can take to the water, enjoy sporting activities and talks from the biggest names in outdoor adventure. The more athletic can run, swim, cycle or combine all three in the triathlon, surrounded by the most stunning scenery and challenging terrain England has to offer. Races include 5-50k runs, open water swimming, triathlons, two cycling sportives and events for junior athletes. Inspiration comes in the form of top athletes, experts and local heroes in the speaker programme hosted at the theatre. Hear all about their adventures and pick up some tips for your own.
Keswick, situated between the huge bulk of Skiddaw and the gentle beauty of Derwentwater, has become the major centre for tourism in the northern Lake District. This pretty market town offers a wide range of attractions for visitors, from shops and restaurants to museums with a difference, and boating trips around lake Derwentwater.
Carlisle has attractions and sights to suit every taste and interest. The three most famous attractions in the city are most likely the 900 year old Castle and Cathedral and the award winning Tullie House Museum & Art Gallery. Carlisle has so much to offer. If it’s fun you want, from extreme sports to quality time with the family, we have the places to play and attractions to visit. For those with an interest in history, the city is full of historic landmarks, significant buildings and interesting sights. If you’re looking for a more chilled out time, Carlisle has plenty of fabulous places to eat and drink before heading out for some top entertainment.

Located on the fringes of the Lake District, Westmorland County Show is a fantastic day out – voted as one of the UK’s favourite Shows and enjoyed by over 30,000 visitors every year. A major livestock Show with classes for cattle, sheep, pigs, goats and alpacas, heavy and light horses too, there’s plenty to see. Come and meet the foxhounds, get up close to magnificent cattle, marvel at the show jumping, discover the interactive displays in our Learning for Life Marquee, get inspired by the WI’s crafty creations, or cheer on your favourites in the Cumberland & Westmorland Wrestling. Be tempted by artisan chocolates, cheeses, pies, gins and much more in the North West’s largest local Food Hall, or drop the children off at our creche and enjoy the Show at your own pace.

Of the many treasures waiting to be discovered in the English Lake District, Lowther Castle is a particular gem. Built at the turn of the 19th century, on the site of two previous houses, the castle was a grand affair boasting a room for every day of the year. Its gardens were the envy of the north. But in 1957 the castle was demolished. Just the façade and outer walls remained standing and for over half a century, the place was empty – home only to chickens, pigs and the odd bat. The gardens were lost to wilderness. Seventy years on from its demolition, Lowther Castle is now one of the most intriguing visitor attractions in the country. Indeed it was voted Large Visitor Attraction of the Year 2018 in the Cumbria Tourism Awards.